LVC Day 2

Another day, another muffin.

Though this time breakfast ofr me also included various melons. After a coffee, a mingle with some GWers, and a mouthful of sugar, it was off to the San Diego room for the second, and final day of the CW f2f meetings.

Today, many of the talks were focussed on sharing results from the old science runs S5 and S6 from iLIGO, as well as a few quick glances at preliminary stuff from O1. Not just the results, though, but updates in various pipelines. There was a little bit of musical chairs and some talks weren’t going to be presented, so others were brought forward.

At lunch, Jenne had promised to introduce me to her friend Greg, a researcher at Walla Walla (A town not too far from the Tri-Cities) who knew all of the good gay bars near Pasadena. His favourite was a country themed bar where they have square dancing lessons. It sounds fun, but not really my thing, and I didn’t bring the right shoes for all of that. We met over salad and pasta, though the lunch hall was busy by the time we got there. I managed to not sit by him to eat, instead sitting by Ryan – the network specialist at Hanford. Ryan and I spoke about this and that, having not really exchanged much more than a “hello” before now. So that was nice. Following food, a handful of people, myself included walked around the neighbourhood, to catch the sun whilst it was out.

After lunch, I headed back into the f2f talks to catch Avi’s talk. He had been doing some theoretical work on Ekman pumping and GW emission within a neutron star, modelling the length of this kind of glitch. I presented the paper upon which his work was based at journal club a few weeks back, but it was nice to see it again, and he furthered the work to predict the length scale of tCW emissions in various fluid models. It was a really interesting presentation.

After the next session, in the afternoon break, a few of us CWers met about tCWs. There are a core group of 8 or 9 people who work towards this, mostly distributed in Glasgow (myself, Matt and Graham) and AEI Hanover (Avi, MAP, Reinhard, David etc), all working on this common goal (all be it in a handful of parallel ways). It was twenty minutes to discuss ideas, implementation, and prospects for development and incorporation into pipelines.

After the break/meeting, I had decided that I would sit in with the EPO (education and public outreach) meeting for a moment, before Grant’s talk back at CW. Martin, Glasgow’s head of school for P&A was there, so before the meeting got started, I chatted to him about some ideas around the Glasgow Science Festival week in June, about some scrapbook  of highlights from this blog, a short video log in various places about LIGO, maybe a time lapse of the the Y-arm from the roof over a day to get the sunset and the stars moving around.

When the meeting got started later than I expected, there was talk about a board game developed called “Observe”. It’s a LIGO game, where players, each with their own model IFO, must prioritise commissioning, research or observation in order to first detect gravitational waves! Let me find a link – no luck, it wasn’t in the slides. I’ll come back when I find it.

[EDIT: The link to the game is here: It’s still somewhat beta, but it’s VERY playable, and quite fun https://gitlab.com/jrollins/ligo-game]

Before we could get to the social media part, where I might have brought up this blog, I headed back to the CW room to catch the last two or three f2f talks for this meeting. Sfter which, it was time for the LAAC’s Detection Party.

We had each been given one free drink token for this night, though it couldn’t be used on the LIGO cocktails that were made special for the occasion. After an hour of wine and nibbles on trays, we were called into one of the larger rooms rooms for the obligatory speech from Gaby. (Gaby being the LVC’s spokesperson, who must spend ~50% of her time writing one speech or another announcement).

After some well picked words, a few rounds of applause, it was time for our world record attempt – the worlds biggest chirp. Chirping was a social media campaign started about the time of the detection, where chirpers would sing the sound of a BBH inspiral (Well, it’s really a BNS as they’re generally higher pitched and longer). We had a few hundred people doing it all at once. A ceremonial slice of GW150914 cake was cut, and it was go time for the party.

12829078_10153603414944315_1244514178669727438_o.jpg

[Image credit to Conor Mow-Lowry]

In one corner of the largest room, the hotel had set up a small dance floor, and had some big ol’ speakers hooked up to an iPod. After a first dance from David Reitze and Gaby, everybody piled in and had a good time to some cheesy classics for a few hours. Dancing in Cali gets warm. By 10 though, the hotel said it was time to move along. My mind went straight to karaoke. A quick google showed that a place nearby, Barney’s Beanery, was the only karaoke bar for miles.

A handful of us, maybe 10 or 15 headed that was, but when we got there, the place was busy, and karaoke was off the table. It was, after all, a Tuesday night. We decided that it would perhaps be better to go somewhere quieter with a more chilled atmosphere. In the Beanery, we ran into some faces from the LVC – Christian and Melody, who recommended a spot around the corner, King’s Row, saying that they’d meet us there.

And that they did. It was a nice bar. We each had a go at buying each other drinks, we chatted about this and that, order 2 plates of chips (fries). Jennie and I, both from Glasgow, were talking to Melody a lot about Margot, mostly old stories from her days at Caltech. Melody and Margot were once, it seems, best buds. By 12.30am it was well past time to head back to the hotel. Sneaking in, trying not to wake the other two would get easier throughout the week.

[Header image credit: Nutsinee Kijbunchoo]
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